Campaign

  1. Barack Obama made his 12th campaign stop in Colorado Thursday evening, when he touched down at University of Colorado-Boulder’s Coors Events Center.

    Greeted by 10,000 people — slightly fewer than his first two visits to the university — Obama spoke about continuing his 2008 sentiment of hope and change, which Allison Sherry at The Denver Post calls his "stick with me" message.

    "We’ve gotten done so much and we’ve never lost sight of the vision that we share, that you would have a voice, that there would be someone at the table fighting every day for middle class Americans," Obama said.

    As expected, the Thursday visit will not be the president’s last before the election. His campaign has tentatively announced a trip to the Community College of Aurora on Sunday, in the Denver suburb where the mass movie theater shooting occurred on July 20.

  2. Abigael, 4, started crying after listening to NPR news on the radio with her mother on the way to the grocery store.

    "I’m tired of Bronco Bamma and Mitt Romney," Abigael said when her mother, a resident of Fort Collins, Colorado, asked her why she was crying.

    The video, widely circulated on social media sites Wednesday, is representative of the sentiment many in swing state Colorado have reached. 

    Wednesday afternoon, NPR’s Mark Memmott wrote:

    On behalf of NPR and all other news outlets, we apologize to Abigael and all the many others who probably feel like her. We must confess, the campaign’s gone on long enough for us, too. Let’s just keep telling ourselves: “Only a few more days, only a few more days, only a few more days.”

  3. The Killers, “Read My Mind” from 2006’s “Sam’s Town” released by The Island Def Jam Music Group

    Probably didn’t peg Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney as a fan of The Killers, did you? Or how about President Barack Obama as a No Doubt fan?

    Romney’s campaign playlist - the music that plays before his appearances and other campaign events- has a variety of genres and artists including a handful of songs from The Killers, whose vocalist, Brandon Flowers, is Mormon like Romney.

     The Atlantic Wire’s Elspeth Reeve says campaign playlists have two main purposes:

    The first is that it’s just a bunch of songs that have a lively enough beat to keep the crowd energetic and happy. The second is that every single artist and tune is selected to subtly communicate messages about the candidate and his policies. 

    Romney’s playlist features some artists who have endorsed him, most notably, Kid Rock. ’80s rocker Meatloaf recently endorsed Romney, but none of his songs have been added to the Romney/Ryan campaign playlist yet.

    Obama’s playlist makes an obvious play toward younger voters, with No Doubt’s “Different People” from 1995’s “Tragic Kingdom” album as well as Florence and the Machine and the Arcade Fire.

    Bruce Springsteen, who recently endorsed Obama and performed a free concert in Charlottesville in support of the president, is also included.

    You can listen and see a complete list of Obama’s playlist here on Spotify.

    You can also check out Romney’s Spotify playlist here.

    theatlanticwire.com »

  4. Speaking to a crowd of about 8,500 outside a middle school in Nashua, N.H. on Saturday, President Obama took shots at Mitt Romney’s record as Governor of Massachusetts.  Obama said that Romney’s tax cuts in Massachusetts helped the wealthy, while raising fees which hurt the middle class.

    ‘‘There were higher fees to be a barber, higher fees to become a nurse,’’ Obama said. ‘‘There were higher fees for gas. There were higher fees for milk. There were higher fees for blind people who needed to get a certificate (saying) that they were blind.’’

  5. Will.i.am of The Black Eyed Peas got a crowd of 12,300 pumped up before President Obama arrived at Sloan’s Lake Park just outside of Denver for the president’s first public appearance after Wednesday’s debate.

    Will.i.am headed to University of Colorado at Boulder and Colorado State University after Obama’s morning rally. He encouraged students to support the President in the 2012 election.

  6. Colorado School of Mines’s “M” can be seen on the foothills over attendees of President Obama’s event in Golden. Instagram photo by Alison Noon.
“This is too pretty, I don’t know how you get any work done here,” Barack Obama said after taking the podium in Golden, Colo. for his eighth political event in the swing state this year. “It is great to be back in Colorado.”
A crowd of 8,400 people gathered to hear the president speak Thursday afternoon at Lions Park in Golden, a suburb of Denver nestled at the base of Colorado’s foothills.
At the nearby Colorado School of Mines, a prestigious engineering university distinguished by responsible stewardship of natural resources, 5,500 students started fall classes last month. The original Coors brewery is one half mile northeast of the park  and on the town main drag, Washington Street, a large wooden sign reads, “Howdy folks! Welcome to Golden, where the west lives.”
Jefferson County has been overwhelmed with politicians this election, representing the suburbia vote that could swing Colorado's nine electoral votes in the presidential race. Paul Ryan spoke at Lakewood High School on Aug. 14, Mitt Romney held an event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds on Aug. 2 and Michelle Obama visited Littleton High School on June 20, all in Jefferson County. At each event, more tickets were given out than venue capacity.
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Jefferson County is dotted with wind turbines, it is a region with “superb” wind energy capabilities according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Home of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the county is a hub of energy innovation, which was a main talking point of Obama’s on Thursday.
"We’ve doubled the amount of renewable energy that we generate from sources like wind and solar power. Thousands of Americans here in Colorado and all across the country have jobs today building wind turbines and long lasting batteries, solar panels, and today the United States of America is less dependent on foreign oil than any time in nearly two decades."
Obama commented on the wind energy tax credit, which contributes funding to employers of as many as 5,000 jobs in Colorado and expires at the end of this year.
"I’m not going to get rid of the wind energy tax credit that is helping to spur this incredibly dynamic sector of our economy," he said. "We need to keep investing in wind and solar and make sure our farmers and scientists are harnessing new biofuels."
Interior Sec. Ken Salazar, a former Senator from Colorado, was back in his home state Thursday, traveling to the University of Colorado at Boulder after making an appearance at Obama’s event.
“Looking after the natural resources in America, Ken Salazar is in the house,” the president announced.
“We’re seeing thousands and thousands of jobs being created through wind, solar, geothermal and advanced biofuels in our country,” Salazar said Wednesday on a conference call with Colorado media. “That is in part because of the increase in production we’re seeing across the country, but also in my home state, Colorado.”
The Romney Victory Bus, which toted Mitt Romney’s son Josh and former Colorado Rep. Bob Beauprez,  parked outside the Old Capitol Grill on Washington Street. during Obama’s event in Golden. It drew about 150 people. 
The Romney bus headed to Boulder, Colo. after the Golden stop, where Josh Romney made remarks in front of roughly 100 University of Colorado students and residents.

    Colorado School of Mines’s “M” can be seen on the foothills over attendees of President Obama’s event in Golden. Instagram photo by Alison Noon.

    “This is too pretty, I don’t know how you get any work done here,” Barack Obama said after taking the podium in Golden, Colo. for his eighth political event in the swing state this year. “It is great to be back in Colorado.”

    A crowd of 8,400 people gathered to hear the president speak Thursday afternoon at Lions Park in Golden, a suburb of Denver nestled at the base of Colorado’s foothills.

    At the nearby Colorado School of Mines, a prestigious engineering university distinguished by responsible stewardship of natural resources, 5,500 students started fall classes last month. The original Coors brewery is one half mile northeast of the park  and on the town main drag, Washington Street, a large wooden sign reads, “Howdy folks! Welcome to Golden, where the west lives.”

    Jefferson County has been overwhelmed with politicians this election, representing the suburbia vote that could swing Colorado's nine electoral votes in the presidential race. Paul Ryan spoke at Lakewood High School on Aug. 14, Mitt Romney held an event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds on Aug. 2 and Michelle Obama visited Littleton High School on June 20, all in Jefferson County. At each event, more tickets were given out than venue capacity.

    Read More

  7. Paul Ryan campaigns Chester County, Pa. on Tuesday. 

  8. They’re going to put y’all back in chains.”

    -

    Vice President, Joe Biden, responding to Mitt Romney’s stance on deregulating Wall Street as he campaigned to a southern Virginia audience on Tuesday.

    The ‘chain’ remarks quickly sparked commotion as the Republican party criticized Biden and Obama’s campaign.

    google.com »

  9. Instagram photos by Samra Khawaja

    President Obama on Thursday brought his “middle class” tour to the richest county in the country: Loudoun county, Va.

    Thousands of supporters waited for hours in extreme heat conditions to hear the President speak in front of the oldest high school in the county, Loudoun County High School.  In the neighborhood across the from school, some residents welcomed the president and his supporters by decorating their front lawns with Mitt Romney posters.

    "Virginia, I have a different plan for America," Obama said. "We do not need tax cuts for wealthy Americans. We need it for working Americans."

    Supporters responded as Obama hammered Romney’s “simple idea” economic plans by chanting “four more years.”

    Obama reminded Loudoun County residents and Virginians of their success throughout his speech. Obama even cited recent Olympic gold medalist Gabrielle Douglas of Virginia Beach as an example of the talent in the state.

    Obama won Virginia by about five points in 2008, becoming the first Democrat since 1964 to win the state in a presidential election.

    "We won Loudoun last time; if we win Loudoun this time, we’ll win Virginia," Obama said. "And if we win Virginia, we’ll win the election."

    After the 25-minute speech ended, first time event goers like Mary Yakush and Helen Van Ryan said it was worth the long wait.

    "I think people are going to have to work really hard to ensure that Obama does win," said Yakush. "But I think he can win."

    "People just need to get out there and vote," said Van Ryan. "If those who are eligible to vote, vote, then Obama can win by a landslide again."

  10. About The 12

    The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

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