Democrat

  1. Lines of voters flocked to the polls at the crack of dawn on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H. Among them was Republican gubernatorial candidate Ovide Lamontagne (right) who posed with a supporter outside the St. Anthony Community Center in Manchester.
Instagram photo by Jake DeSchuiteneer

    Lines of voters flocked to the polls at the crack of dawn on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H. Among them was Republican gubernatorial candidate Ovide Lamontagne (right) who posed with a supporter outside the St. Anthony Community Center in Manchester.

    Instagram photo by Jake DeSchuiteneer

  2. I am Democrat because I believe in the ‘American Promise’. Where opportunity is offered to anybody who is willing to earn it. The education and brightening of early childhood is the best thing for my generation and generations to come. People deserve the right to achieve anything they put their minds to and the opportunity should be presented to those who work hard enough to earn it. Everyone is different in their own right and should have equal rights regardless of their differences. I am Democrat because I honestly believe we will bring the better tomorrow that everyone deserves.”

    -

    Aubrey Smith, student at the University of New Mexico in Gallup, N.M. 

    Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither?  

    Send us a message, tag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or tweet  using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

    Tweet #VoterVoices

  3. Samantha Scannell, Wayne State University student, Michigan

    Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither? The Washington Post is gathering responses to that question at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this week for Unconventional. And we want to hear your responses, too. 

    Send us a message, tag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or tweet  using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

    Tweet #VoterVoices

  4. Lawrence Robinson, a Wayne State University student, explains how family values influence his politics.

    Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither? The Washington Post is gathering responses to that question at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week for Unconventional.  

    Send us a messagetag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or on Twitter using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

    Tweet #VoterVoices

  5. Isaac Hirschfeld, a Senior at the University of New Hampshire, on why he is a Democrat.

    Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither? The Washington Post is gathering responses to that question at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week for Unconventional.  

    Send us a message, tag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or tweet us using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

  6. Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither? The Washington Post is gathering responses to that question at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week for Unconventional.  

    Send us a message, tag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or on Twitter using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

    Washington Post »

  7. Nick Spare, student at Trinity College, Round Hill, Va.

    Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither? The Washington Post is gathering responses to that question at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week for Unconventional.  

    Send us a message, tag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or on Twitter using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

    Washington Post »

  8. Frank Allison, Painter, Leesburg, Va.

    Why are you a Republican, a Democrat, or neither? The Washington Post is gathering responses to that question at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week for Unconventional.  

    Send us a message, tag the Washington Post in a SocialCam video and title it “Unconventional,” or on Twitter using the hashtag #VoterVoices.  

    Washington Post »

  9. Purple Politics: A battle for the Tar Heel state?
Photo Illustration by Ariana Rodriguez-Gitler, Allie Russel and Katie SweeneyStory by Erika Keil
North Carolina has the potential to join the ranks of Ohio, New Hampshire and Florida as a permanently purple, battleground state, say several political observers and pundits in the state.
Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama have been neck-and-neck for months in statewide polls.
Public Policy Polling, a left-leaning polling firm based in Raleigh, recently published a poll showing Obama leading Romney by 49 percent to 46 percent in the state, a virtual tie within the margin of error of plus or minus 3.4 percent.
“We have polled North Carolina 22 times, and Obama and Romney have been within three points of each other 21 of those times,” said Tom Jensen, director of the polling firm.
He added that permanent demographic changes in the state could cause this trend to continue far beyond the upcoming election.
“The combination of young voters being so Democratic-leaning in North Carolina and so much of the population growth coming from more liberal states such as California, New York and New Jersey could make this long-term,” Jensen said.
Obama narrowly won North Carolina by about 14,000 votes in 2008, but a sputtering economic recovery has prevented the president from gaining more of a foothold in the state. North Carolina’s unemployment rate of 9.6 percent, tied for fifth-highest among states, ranks higher than the national rate of 8.3 percent.

    Purple Politics: A battle for the Tar Heel state?

    Photo Illustration by Ariana Rodriguez-Gitler, Allie Russel and Katie Sweeney
    Story by Erika Keil

    North Carolina has the potential to join the ranks of Ohio, New Hampshire and Florida as a permanently purple, battleground state, say several political observers and pundits in the state.

    Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama have been neck-and-neck for months in statewide polls.

    Public Policy Polling, a left-leaning polling firm based in Raleigh, recently published a poll showing Obama leading Romney by 49 percent to 46 percent in the state, a virtual tie within the margin of error of plus or minus 3.4 percent.

    “We have polled North Carolina 22 times, and Obama and Romney have been within three points of each other 21 of those times,” said Tom Jensen, director of the polling firm.

    He added that permanent demographic changes in the state could cause this trend to continue far beyond the upcoming election.

    “The combination of young voters being so Democratic-leaning in North Carolina and so much of the population growth coming from more liberal states such as California, New York and New Jersey could make this long-term,” Jensen said.

    Obama narrowly won North Carolina by about 14,000 votes in 2008, but a sputtering economic recovery has prevented the president from gaining more of a foothold in the state. North Carolina’s unemployment rate of 9.6 percent, tied for fifth-highest among states, ranks higher than the national rate of 8.3 percent.

    dailytarheel.com »

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

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haleykmetz

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mechellehankerson

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news-junkie

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remadebyjade

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rileyjsnyder

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ryankellett

sarahglen

sarahglen

tessafox

tessafox

thatgoeshere

thatgoeshere

washingtonpostpolitics

washingtonpostpolitics

zachtilly

zachtilly