Election

  1. Three days after the election, while most of the country has moved on with their lives, Florida remains technically in voter limbo. 

    Mitt Romney’s campaign officials here conceded on Thursday and the Obama campaign has claimed victory. 

    The state’s counties — overwhelmed by the amount of absentee and early voting ballots — still have not finished counting votes. Although the presidential race results will not be affected if Florida decides to lean blue or red, voters are curious to see who won the swing state. 

    The Tampa Bay Times reports that President Obama has the lead over Governor Romney, 49.9 percent to his 49.2 percent. 

    The country will have to wait one more day for the announcement of the official winner of Florida. The deadline for Florida’s counties to have their results in is Saturday at noon. 

  2. For the first time in history, one state will have a congressional delegation made up entirely of women, and one occupying the governor’s office as well.

    New Hampshire Democrat Maggie Hassan defeated opponent Ovide Lamontagne in the state race for governor, and Democrats Carol Shea-Porter and Ann Kuster were elected to the state’s 1st and 2nd Congressional districts. 

    Shea-Porter and Kuster will join two other women who were not up for election on Tuesday, Sens. Jeanne Shaheen (D) and Kelly Ayotte (R).

  3. Cindi Scott (right), an election support judge in Boulder, Colo., reels out tape to measure the distance from the door of Grace Lutheran Church to where Shana Parker (left) is passing out voter guides and advocating for Obama.
In Colorado, it is illegal for electioneering, such as Parker’s, to happen within 100 feet of the entrance to a polling station. Parker was forced to move across the street after it was found that she was about 4 ft. too close. She was not upset.
"I’m glad that they’re upholding the law," Parker said. "That’s what we need to be doing all over the country."

    Cindi Scott (right), an election support judge in Boulder, Colo., reels out tape to measure the distance from the door of Grace Lutheran Church to where Shana Parker (left) is passing out voter guides and advocating for Obama.

    In Colorado, it is illegal for electioneering, such as Parker’s, to happen within 100 feet of the entrance to a polling station. Parker was forced to move across the street after it was found that she was about 4 ft. too close. She was not upset.

    "I’m glad that they’re upholding the law," Parker said. "That’s what we need to be doing all over the country."

  4. Hannah Herried, a longtime Boulder, Colorado resident and senior at CU Boulder, says that there has been substantially less tumult this election than she witnessed in Boulder, a liberal hub, in 2008.
"Last election I drove around campus on a party bus with the Beastie Boys [on Election Day], there is nowhere near that amount of excitement this time."
Herreid says that she worked on Obama’s 2008 campaign, and recalls watching votes come in at Boulder Outlook Hotel.
"It was like an explosion when the votes came in, everyone was screaming and crying and hugging and, it’s so exciting just remembering it. And the next day it was the same thing," she says.
Herreid attests that young voters on the Boulder campus primarily voted early this year, like she did. Although Republicans led in early voting numbers in the state, she continues to believe that Obama will win the 2012 election.
"The thing is that I want Obama to win," Herreid said Tuesday. "I think the majority of the country realizes that he is on the right track and changing leadership now is not going to help anyone."

    Hannah Herried, a longtime Boulder, Colorado resident and senior at CU Boulder, says that there has been substantially less tumult this election than she witnessed in Boulder, a liberal hub, in 2008.

    "Last election I drove around campus on a party bus with the Beastie Boys [on Election Day], there is nowhere near that amount of excitement this time."

    Herreid says that she worked on Obama’s 2008 campaign, and recalls watching votes come in at Boulder Outlook Hotel.

    "It was like an explosion when the votes came in, everyone was screaming and crying and hugging and, it’s so exciting just remembering it. And the next day it was the same thing," she says.

    Herreid attests that young voters on the Boulder campus primarily voted early this year, like she did. Although Republicans led in early voting numbers in the state, she continues to believe that Obama will win the 2012 election.

    "The thing is that I want Obama to win," Herreid said Tuesday. "I think the majority of the country realizes that he is on the right track and changing leadership now is not going to help anyone."

  5. As Virginians take to the polls today, the issue of whether or not the state’s new law will discourage some voters is important as ever.
The law expands the list of acceptable forms of ID for voters and also provides voters with a free state-issued voter ID card. Previously, voters in the state could sign affirmations of identity if they didn’t have proper ID and still cast a ballot. Now voters without proper ID will have to cast a provisional ballot until they provide local registrar’s offices with appropriate ID.
The law, which sparked controversy over the misleading assumption that Virginia’s law requires photo ID for all voters, was signed in July and is in effect for this year’s election.
Check out how some voters on Twitter are handling —or making a joke out of— Virginia’s voter ID law.

    As Virginians take to the polls today, the issue of whether or not the state’s new law will discourage some voters is important as ever.

    The law expands the list of acceptable forms of ID for voters and also provides voters with a free state-issued voter ID card. Previously, voters in the state could sign affirmations of identity if they didn’t have proper ID and still cast a ballot. Now voters without proper ID will have to cast a provisional ballot until they provide local registrar’s offices with appropriate ID.

    The law, which sparked controversy over the misleading assumption that Virginia’s law requires photo ID for all voters, was signed in July and is in effect for this year’s election.

    Check out how some voters on Twitter are handling —or making a joke out of— Virginia’s voter ID law.

    storify.com »

  6. President Obama was joined by former President Bill Clinton in Concord, New Hampshire on Sunday.  

    “As President Obama has told us there’s this great public health epidemic, this virus, sweeping across America causing a condition known as Romnesia,” Clinton told the crowd of about 14,000 gathered, “and the virus is so rampant that anybody’s vulnerable to gettin’ a little of it.”

  7. Supporters of President Obama stood for hours, chanting and cheering during the wait to wait to hear First Lady Michelle Obama speak to a packed crowd in the Prime F. Osborn III center in Jacksonville, Fla. on Thursday.

    Legendary musician Stevie Wonder extended the crowd’s patience during the wait for Obama, playing a few of his mega-hits, including “Superstitious” and “Sir Duke”.

    Wonder and Obama both stressed the importance of voting early. The last day for Floridians to vote early is today. 

  8. Eighteen months and roughly one million political TV ads ago, Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign started in New Hampshire.  Last June, the Republican nominee announced his candidacy right here in the Granite State.  

    Next week, Romney’s campaign will end right where it started.

    Romney’s “Victory Rally” will be held in Manchester, N.H. at 9:30 PM next Monday night.  Celebrity supporter Kid Rock will join as a special guest.

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

Read more »

Submit your ideas

Do you have interesting news, notes, quotes, campaign materials or multimedia that we should feature? Do you have something to report about young voters?

Talk to us »

Contributors to The 12

View contributor bios »

ngjennings

ngjennings

ryankellett

ryankellett

washingtonpostpolitics

washingtonpostpolitics

alison-noon

alison-noon

haleykmetz

haleykmetz

jakepdeschuiteneer

jakepdeschuiteneer

justinlagore

justinlagore

mechellehankerson

mechellehankerson

news-junkie

news-junkie

remadebyjade

remadebyjade

rileyjsnyder

rileyjsnyder

sarahglen

sarahglen

tessafox

tessafox

thatgoeshere

thatgoeshere

tylerborchers

tylerborchers

zachtilly

zachtilly