Money

  1. Together, ten Pennsylvanians have donated nearly $9 million to their preferred candidates since 2011. The majority of these wealthy Pennsylvanians supported Republican candidates. All ten of them are men.

  2. An interactive map of the power players in Colorado politics: Check out who is funding races within Colorado, where they are putting their money how much they’re spending.

  3. The period of time that remains is going to be totally supercharged in terms of fundraising. It’s an absolute blizzard. A tsunami. It’s completely and utterly intense.”

    -

    - Democratic lobbyist Larry O’Brian on the flurry of last-minute Congressional fundraising heading into Election Day. Via Roll Call. (via campaignmoney)

    On a similar note, a Colorado ballot initiative, Amendment 65, hopes to turn state legislators and future legislation against the Citizens United decision and limit campaign contributions to political races. A campaign to support the amendment has raised $551,700 to date.

    campaignmoney »

  4. Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?

    "I think it probably has [been worse] in the last four years, since my husband has been laid off so much," -Diane Swanson, 51, Bristol, Wis.

    See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on Virginia voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.

    What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

  5. Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?
"I would say I’m in a better financial situation now than I was in 2008. In December I was lucky enough to get a good paying factory job, and next month I’ll be starting a new job as a manager at a local business. With some help from my parents, my girlfriend and I were able to move into our own house, buy a new car and are now expecting our first daughter in September. I don’t know how much my financial situation has to do with Barack Obama’s first term in office, but I’m very thankful to be able to provide for my family during a time when a lot of people are struggling." -Cody Griffin, 21, Kenosha, Wis.
See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on Virginia voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.
What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

    Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?

    "I would say I’m in a better financial situation now than I was in 2008. In December I was lucky enough to get a good paying factory job, and next month I’ll be starting a new job as a manager at a local business. With some help from my parents, my girlfriend and I were able to move into our own house, buy a new car and are now expecting our first daughter in September. I don’t know how much my financial situation has to do with Barack Obama’s first term in office, but I’m very thankful to be able to provide for my family during a time when a lot of people are struggling." -Cody Griffin, 21, Kenosha, Wis.

    See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on Virginia voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.

    What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

  6. Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?"Financially, everything is still the same for me. I still have average credit, I can’t get approved for a house loan and my salary is still the same after a year and a half. It’s frustrating. I don’t know if my situation staying the same has anything to do with Obama’s first term in office, but I’m still waiting for that bill where medical bills don’t show up on your credit record. I thought that was supposed to be passed months ago." — Katie Matalas, 27, Kenosha, Wis.
See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.
What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

    Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?

    "Financially, everything is still the same for me. I still have average credit, I can’t get approved for a house loan and my salary is still the same after a year and a half. It’s frustrating. I don’t know if my situation staying the same has anything to do with Obama’s first term in office, but I’m still waiting for that bill where medical bills don’t show up on your credit record. I thought that was supposed to be passed months ago." — Katie Matalas, 27, Kenosha, Wis.

    See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.

    What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

    Washington Post »

  7. source2012:

ANALYSIS: 2012 election will cost $5.8 BILLION — our most expensive yet | OpenSecrets.org

The 2012 presidential and congressional elections will be the most expensive on record, the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics estimates. The Center predicts, based on data from 18 months of fundraising and spending, that the elections will cost $5.8 billion, an increase of 7 percent from the 2008 cost of $5.4 billion. 
So far overall in the first 18 months of the 2012 cycle, $2.2 billion has been spent, compared with $2.4 billion in 2008.
The presidential race by itself will cost about $2.5 billion, the Center predicts, in funds laid out by the candidates, Democratic and Republican party committees and outside spending groups.

    source2012:

    ANALYSIS: 2012 election will cost $5.8 BILLION — our most expensive yet | OpenSecrets.org

    The 2012 presidential and congressional elections will be the most expensive on record, the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics estimates. The Center predicts, based on data from 18 months of fundraising and spending, that the elections will cost $5.8 billion, an increase of 7 percent from the 2008 cost of $5.4 billion

    So far overall in the first 18 months of the 2012 cycle, $2.2 billion has been spent, compared with $2.4 billion in 2008.

    The presidential race by itself will cost about $2.5 billion, the Center predicts, in funds laid out by the candidates, Democratic and Republican party committees and outside spending groups.

    (via opensecretsdc)

    opensecrets.org »

  8. The Romney campaign raised $100 million in the month of June - that’s about the same amount Obama’s campaign raised in April and May combined. From super PACs to public donations, will this year’s election be a battle of the bucks or a race for realistic ideas?

    The Romney campaign raised $100 million in the month of June - that’s about the same amount Obama’s campaign raised in April and May combined. From super PACs to public donations, will this year’s election be a battle of the bucks or a race for realistic ideas?

    cartoonpolitics »

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

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