Ohio

  1. Click here for the full visual on state and county results from the presidential election, and here for additional exit polling data.

    President Obama’s bailout of the auto industry was both praised and criticized throughout the election season. Now, exit polling data shows the decision so many thought might cost him the votes of those concerned with the economy was actually one that helped the President secure Ohio, which was nearly tied until the end.

    Data from the Associated Press revealed most Ohio voters stood behind the president’s decision to bail out General Motors and Chrysler. Ohioans were evenly split on who they believed would be best to fix the economy, but the fact that one in eight jobs in Ohio is tied to the auto industry gave Obama an edge as the middle class cast their ballots.

  2. Tuesday night saw voters on the edge of their seats as the nation waited, wondering whether the Buckeye State would turn blue or red.

    But while Americans had their eyes glued to maps and poll numbers waiting to see who would be the new President of the United States, a race just as heated stole its share of the lime light in Ohio.

    In the highly contested battleground state, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) and Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel waged war on each other competing for Brown’s spot representing Ohio in the Senate.

    The Daily Kent Stater sent photographers to cover both campaigns’ watch parties in Columbus, Ohio, where supporters of both sides reacted to Brown’s victory.

    kentwired.com »

  3. Some precincts saw much shorter lines on election day thanks to the popularity of early voting and absentee ballots. But with the increase in early voters, the question has been raised: Does a vote still count if the voter dies before election day?

    According to this article from the Plain Dealer, the answer is yes.

    Ohio law has never dealt with the situation specifically, but after receiving the inquiry, the Ohio Secretary of State’s office issued a ruling.

    Laws differ from state to state, however. Previously, the vote of a South-Dakota woman who voted for Hilary Clinton in the Democratic Primary was nullified as she died before the day of the actual Primary. In a similar case, President Obama’s late grandmother cast her absentee ballot for her grandson in Hawaii, where her ballot was still counted after her death.

    cleveland.com »

  4. Former New York Times Editor-In-Chief Bill Keller recently wrote about his visit to Paul Ryan’s alma mater, Miami University:

    This patch of southern Ohio between Cincinnati and Dayton is not the up-for-grabs Ohio you’ve read so much about. This is decided country, where House Speaker John Boehner is running for re-election unopposed, where “Defeat Obama” and “Romney/Ryan” lawn signs glisten in the chilly drizzle.

    Tyler Borchers, a student at Ohio University, gives his take for The 12:

    I’ve read about an up-for-grabs Ohio too — I just haven’t encountered it in the 21 years I’ve lived here. What I see is an Ohio represented in the Senate by one of its most liberal members and a vestige of the Bush administration. The Ohio I know isn’t undecided, moderate or low information, it’s just evenly mixed. My hometown, Troy, is as decidedly conservative as my college town, Athens, is liberal. National media that extrapolate Ohio’s swing status to individual Ohioans severely misunderstand our politics. We aren’t a blank screen on an Etch A Sketch. We’re equal parts New York and Texas.

  5. Arizona State University’s campus groups, including the Arizona Students’ Association, the Young Democrats, Students for Mitt and Students for Liberty, will be spending election day  posting and distributing election information to encourage voting.
Political science professor Rodolfo Espino told State Press reporter Riis Valcho that Nevada, Ohio and Florida will likely decide the race.
"In my analysis, if Obama wins Ohio, it will be a short night," he said. "But if Romney wins Ohio, look for it to be a long night with Nevada in the west playing a deciding factor."

    Arizona State University’s campus groups, including the Arizona Students’ Association, the Young Democrats, Students for Mitt and Students for Liberty, will be spending election day  posting and distributing election information to encourage voting.

    Political science professor Rodolfo Espino told State Press reporter Riis Valcho that Nevada, Ohio and Florida will likely decide the race.

    "In my analysis, if Obama wins Ohio, it will be a short night," he said. "But if Romney wins Ohio, look for it to be a long night with Nevada in the west playing a deciding factor."

    statepress.com »

  6. For those still on the fence, theballot.org might be exactly what the doctor ordered to help decide how to vote.

    The site allows students to register and write their own voter guides in which they express their own views on the issues in their area, as well as nationally.

    Those looking for some guidance can search the guides by address. Once entered, the site will generate a list of all the issues on the ballot for that area along with the options to see how people have reported voting or what they’ve commented on the issue. The site also gives users the option of viewing voter guides from those nearby.

  7. Actor Jack Black’s band, Tenacious D, will visit Kent State University’s campus Friday to encourage students to get out and vote.

    Hosted by the Kent State College Democrats and the Ohio Democratic Party, the band will make an appearance in the student center. Students will then have the option of being shuttled to the Portage County Board of Elections in Ravenna, Ohio, where they can cast their ballots.

    Bryan Staul, president of the Kent State College Democrats, commented that the band’s visit is one more on a long list of celebrities, including “Newsroom” actress Olivia Munn,  who have visited campus over the semester to increase student involvement in the election.

    kentwired.com »

  8. One of CNN’s latest election coverage projects breaks the voting numbers down and makes things slightly easier to visualize as the presidential candidates enter the final stretch of the election neck and neck.

    The infographic page displays a national range across the top of the page with results of nine battleground states below.

    Currently, the chart shows Romney leading nationally by one percent. Of the nine swing states CNN has coverage of, Romney has the advantage in Florida, however Obama has the lead in the other eight.

    Take a look at the charts for yourself and check back for updates.

    CNN »

  9. Photos by Laura Fong. Reporting by Angela Pino, city reporter for the Daily Kent Stater.

    It’s not every day that a former president serves as an opening act, but that is exactly what happened at a rally for Barack Obama in Parma Thursday.

    “I had 20-something jobs before becoming President,” former President Bill Clinton said. “But this is my first time warming up for Bruce Springsteen.”

    Congresswoman Betty Sutton welcomed the crowd of 3,000 to Cuyahoga Community College saying one man ran the nation and the other was born to run. As Clinton thanked her and took the stage, he said Ohio and the United States both need her in Congress.

    Clinton started out saying he’s a job guy and that before President Obama took office, the United States was losing 800,000 jobs a month. While he did not go into specifics on how, he said the Republicans had done a lot to keep unemployment above 8 percent and they were crushed when it fell to 7.8. Clinton said they are still not satisfied with that number, but it is the biggest one-year drop in 17 years.

    Clinton closed his speech by saying, “There’s no going back, we’re coming back,” then he introduced “one of the most important forces in American music and one of the coolest guys I’ve met, Bruce Springsteen.”

    Springsteen admitted that speaking after Clinton is similar to singing after Elvis and quickly started strumming his guitar starting with “No Surrender.”

    Clinton’s visit came on the heels of presidential hopeful Mitt Romney’s speech outside the Cuyahoga Falls Natatorium Tuesday, where he discussed balancing the budget and job creation.

    kentwired.com »

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

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