Politics

  1. The presidential election is over, which means residents of the battlegrounds we have covered for the past several months can join the rest of the states in enjoying attack-ad free commercial breaks and keeping their phones plugged in without risking constant pollster or campaign calls. 

    It also means the end of our posts here on The 12. 

    Thank you for following our student journalists’ coverage from the swing states across the country. We’ll see you in 2016. 

  2. Click here for the full visual on state and county results from the presidential election, and here for additional exit polling data.

    President Obama’s bailout of the auto industry was both praised and criticized throughout the election season. Now, exit polling data shows the decision so many thought might cost him the votes of those concerned with the economy was actually one that helped the President secure Ohio, which was nearly tied until the end.

    Data from the Associated Press revealed most Ohio voters stood behind the president’s decision to bail out General Motors and Chrysler. Ohioans were evenly split on who they believed would be best to fix the economy, but the fact that one in eight jobs in Ohio is tied to the auto industry gave Obama an edge as the middle class cast their ballots.

  3. Tuesday night saw voters on the edge of their seats as the nation waited, wondering whether the Buckeye State would turn blue or red.

    But while Americans had their eyes glued to maps and poll numbers waiting to see who would be the new President of the United States, a race just as heated stole its share of the lime light in Ohio.

    In the highly contested battleground state, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) and Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel waged war on each other competing for Brown’s spot representing Ohio in the Senate.

    The Daily Kent Stater sent photographers to cover both campaigns’ watch parties in Columbus, Ohio, where supporters of both sides reacted to Brown’s victory.

    kentwired.com »

  4. Barry Petersen of CBS explains that Obama won Colorado because of his campaign’s strong ground game, and the Hispanic vote, which comprises 11 percent of the state’s electorate.

    Obama won Colorado’s nine electoral votes by a margin of 4.7 percent. See full results for each state here

  5. "It’s about your future. It’s about access to college and whether or not we’re going to make sure we’ve got great jobs for you." 

    U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) wins her third term and talks about the importance of the youth vote to her successful campaign. 

  6. President Obama’s re-election and the return of the Democratic majority in the U.S. Senate have solidified Obamacare as law. After months of holding out for Obama’s defeat, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) and other state officials have seven days to decide how to hand Affordable Health Care Act before the federal deadline, Nov. 16.

    The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports what this decision means for Wisconsin, here.

  7. Here’s one (presumably temporary) tattoo Obama supporter Krystle Collins of Michigan probably doesn’t regret the next day. 
This guy, on the other hand… 

    Here’s one (presumably temporary) tattoo Obama supporter Krystle Collins of Michigan probably doesn’t regret the next day. 

    This guy, on the other hand… 

  8. Last night Barack Obama was the victorious candidate for the presidency. But this morning, residents in Florida are still wondering who won their state.

    According to the Florida Department of State Division of Elections, nine counties have still not completed counting their absentee ballots. 

    The Miami Herald reports Miami-Dade is one of those counties. As of Wednesday morning, the county still had 20,000 absentee ballots left to count. Miami-Dade county, victim of lack of resources and an unexpectedly high volume of voters on Election Day, experienced extremely long lines that lasted throughout the night. At one polling place, the last voter was said to have left at 1 a.m. According to the voter protection law, any voter who arrives in line before 7 p.m. has the right to cast a ballot.

  9. For the first time in history, one state will have a congressional delegation made up entirely of women, and one occupying the governor’s office as well.

    New Hampshire Democrat Maggie Hassan defeated opponent Ovide Lamontagne in the state race for governor, and Democrats Carol Shea-Porter and Ann Kuster were elected to the state’s 1st and 2nd Congressional districts. 

    Shea-Porter and Kuster will join two other women who were not up for election on Tuesday, Sens. Jeanne Shaheen (D) and Kelly Ayotte (R).

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

Read more »

Submit your ideas

Do you have interesting news, notes, quotes, campaign materials or multimedia that we should feature? Do you have something to report about young voters?

Talk to us »

Contributors to The 12

View contributor bios »

alison-noon

alison-noon

haleykmetz

haleykmetz

jakepdeschuiteneer

jakepdeschuiteneer

justinlagore

justinlagore

mechellehankerson

mechellehankerson

news-junkie

news-junkie

ngjennings

ngjennings

remadebyjade

remadebyjade

rileyjsnyder

rileyjsnyder

ryankellett

ryankellett

sarahglen

sarahglen

tessafox

tessafox

thatgoeshere

thatgoeshere

washingtonpostpolitics

washingtonpostpolitics

zachtilly

zachtilly