Presidential election

  1. Photo by Logan Ouellette, junior at Southern New Hampshire University
President Obama, New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch (D), and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D) greeted a crowd of about 6,000 assembled at Veterans Park in Manchester, N.H. on Friday morning.  
The President keyed in on one of his messages from Tuesday night’s presidential debate, knocking Mitt Romney’s explanation of his proposed tax plan.
“He took another swing at it, and he whiffed,” Obama said of Romney. “Instead of telling us how he’d pay for it, he said, ‘I’ll let you know after the election.’ And then when I asked him about it, he said, ‘I’m a business man, I know the numbers will work.’”  

    Photo by Logan Ouellette, junior at Southern New Hampshire University

    President Obama, New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch (D), and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D) greeted a crowd of about 6,000 assembled at Veterans Park in Manchester, N.H. on Friday morning.  

    The President keyed in on one of his messages from Tuesday night’s presidential debate, knocking Mitt Romney’s explanation of his proposed tax plan.

    “He took another swing at it, and he whiffed,” Obama said of Romney. “Instead of telling us how he’d pay for it, he said, ‘I’ll let you know after the election.’ And then when I asked him about it, he said, ‘I’m a business man, I know the numbers will work.’”  

    seacoastonline.com »

  2. Youth vote needs rekindling
Photo by Molly Cogburn, Story by Claire Bennett of the Daily Tar Heel
At President Barack Obama’s political rallies, supporters have been known to shout, “Fired up! Ready to go!”
But one of Obama’s key demographics that supported his victory in 2008 — youth voters — might not be so fired up this time around.
Young voters’ enthusiasm on college campuses helped spur Obama to victory in North Carolina, which he won by about 14,000 votes in 2008.
Yet compared to the 2008 election, the UNC campus isn’t looking as patriotic as it did four years ago, said Erin Sanderson, a 2012 UNCgraduate.
“There was a lot going on in 2008 — a lot of red, white and blue,” she said.
And the amount of campaign rallying on campus was borderline overwhelming, she recalled.
“I almost felt harassed. You couldn’t walk through the Pit without being stopped three times for voter registration,” Sanderson said.
Gabby Whitehall, co-founder of Tar Heels for Obama, said her feelings have not changed since the 2008 election, but she has seen some dwindling some of her peers’ excitement.
While more than 80 people attended the group’s Democratic National Convention watch party and the rooms are full at meetings, Whitehall said she has had difficulty rallying students to participate in voter outreach activities, like door-to-door canvassing and voter registration.
“What can be difficult is actually getting people out there and doing the hard stuff,” she said.
Some political analysts attribute less enthusiasm on campuses to disenchantment with the political system as a whole.
Sarah Treul, a UNC political science professor who specializes in American political institutions, said there was far more excitement on campus in the months preceding the 2008 election.
She said the general lack of enthusiasm for the 2012 election has more to do with an increasing apathy toward politics in general, rather than dissatisfaction with either candidate.
Young voters might have become overly optimistic due to much of the hopeful rhetoric of 2008, she said. Obama’s message resonated with students who believed that politics could be different.
“Four years later, I think a lot of students realize that even despite the ‘hope and change’ message, much in politics remains the same from election to election,” she said in an email.
While there might be less excitement surrounding Obama’s campaign on campuses this year, college Republicans say they’ve seen an uptick in support for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney compared to his predecessor.
“Young voters are turning out significantly more so for Romney than (John) McCain,” said Kenan Drum, president of UNC for Romney.
“Voters are both unhappy with the current situation and the solutions that President Obama has offered.”
Drum said there’s been an increased number of Republican students willing to knock on doors, register voters and participate in phone banks in Chapel Hill.
Although the lack of fervent support for Obama’s campaign might worry some younger Democrats, Whitehall said it’s natural for a sitting president to experience less buzz surrounding a reelection campaign.
“Everyone knows the president and his policies and there is no need for (the 2008 levels of excitement) in 2012, but that doesn’t signify a lack of enthusiasm or support among voters,” she said.
“This happens to every incumbent.”
Despite mixed levels of enthusiasm, both campaigns will continue to reach out to young voters and rally support on campuses across the country through events like debate watch parties for the Nov. 6 election.
The presidential debates will commence Wednesday evening, with the first one being held at the University of Denver in Colorado.

    Youth vote needs rekindling

    Photo by Molly Cogburn, Story by Claire Bennett of the Daily Tar Heel

    At President Barack Obama’s political rallies, supporters have been known to shout, “Fired up! Ready to go!”

    But one of Obama’s key demographics that supported his victory in 2008 — youth voters — might not be so fired up this time around.

    Young voters’ enthusiasm on college campuses helped spur Obama to victory in North Carolina, which he won by about 14,000 votes in 2008.

    Yet compared to the 2008 election, the UNC campus isn’t looking as patriotic as it did four years ago, said Erin Sanderson, a 2012 UNCgraduate.

    “There was a lot going on in 2008 — a lot of red, white and blue,” she said.

    And the amount of campaign rallying on campus was borderline overwhelming, she recalled.

    “I almost felt harassed. You couldn’t walk through the Pit without being stopped three times for voter registration,” Sanderson said.

    Gabby Whitehall, co-founder of Tar Heels for Obama, said her feelings have not changed since the 2008 election, but she has seen some dwindling some of her peers’ excitement.

    While more than 80 people attended the group’s Democratic National Convention watch party and the rooms are full at meetings, Whitehall said she has had difficulty rallying students to participate in voter outreach activities, like door-to-door canvassing and voter registration.

    “What can be difficult is actually getting people out there and doing the hard stuff,” she said.

    Some political analysts attribute less enthusiasm on campuses to disenchantment with the political system as a whole.

    Sarah Treul, a UNC political science professor who specializes in American political institutions, said there was far more excitement on campus in the months preceding the 2008 election.

    She said the general lack of enthusiasm for the 2012 election has more to do with an increasing apathy toward politics in general, rather than dissatisfaction with either candidate.

    Young voters might have become overly optimistic due to much of the hopeful rhetoric of 2008, she said. Obama’s message resonated with students who believed that politics could be different.

    “Four years later, I think a lot of students realize that even despite the ‘hope and change’ message, much in politics remains the same from election to election,” she said in an email.

    While there might be less excitement surrounding Obama’s campaign on campuses this year, college Republicans say they’ve seen an uptick in support for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney compared to his predecessor.

    “Young voters are turning out significantly more so for Romney than (John) McCain,” said Kenan Drum, president of UNC for Romney.

    “Voters are both unhappy with the current situation and the solutions that President Obama has offered.”

    Drum said there’s been an increased number of Republican students willing to knock on doors, register voters and participate in phone banks in Chapel Hill.

    Although the lack of fervent support for Obama’s campaign might worry some younger Democrats, Whitehall said it’s natural for a sitting president to experience less buzz surrounding a reelection campaign.

    “Everyone knows the president and his policies and there is no need for (the 2008 levels of excitement) in 2012, but that doesn’t signify a lack of enthusiasm or support among voters,” she said.

    “This happens to every incumbent.”

    Despite mixed levels of enthusiasm, both campaigns will continue to reach out to young voters and rally support on campuses across the country through events like debate watch parties for the Nov. 6 election.

    The presidential debates will commence Wednesday evening, with the first one being held at the University of Denver in Colorado.

    dailytarheel.com »

  3. From Post-Gazette.com:

    A judge has blocked the state from discounting ballots cast next month by voters who lack the photo identification required under the new voter ID law.

    Voters will be asked for their identification at the polls, but will vote by normal procedures and their vote will count regardless of whether they have an ID, according to officials on both sides of the case.




  4. …we want to make sure that people know that we’re checking for this, and that we don’t want them voting twice in this upcoming election.”

    -

    Arizona Secretary of State Ken Bennett on nine new cases of possible voter fraud in the 2008 presidential election.

    "Whether it’s nine cases or 90 or 900, we’re going to try to identify if it’s happening, and when it does, we’re going to prosecute and we’re going to try to prevent it from happening at all," he said

    Arizona is a member of the Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck program, which reports voter irregularities from data submitted by its 15 member states. Only seven cases of voter fraud have gone to court in Arizona since 2000, according to News21.

    kjzz.org »

  5. The post-convention political spotlight shone directly on the Granite State on Friday, as both President Obama and Mitt Romney made campaign stops in New Hampshire.  

    Obama made a midday speech in Portsmouth, NH, and Romney made an evening stop in Nashua.  

  6. Mitt Romney is now within five points of President Obama New Mexico, a state that has been leaning toward the president, in a July 2012 poll by Public Policy Polling. 

  7. Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?
"I don’t think my financial situation has changed. I don’t think that any of what Obama has done has affected it in either direction." — Diane Raymond, 25, Manchester, NH
See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on Virginia voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.
What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

    Would you say you, yourself are better off financially than you were when Obama became president, not as well off, or in about the same shape as then financially?

    "I don’t think my financial situation has changed. I don’t think that any of what Obama has done has affected it in either direction." — Diane Raymond, 25, Manchester, NH

    See more responses to this question on The Post’s Liberty: Through the Lens project, the second in a series of photo and audio essays on Virginia voters’ opinions as they wrestle with the issues of 2012.

    What’s your response? Tell us on Tumblr here, or on Twitter using #VoterVoices.

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

Read more »

Submit your ideas

Do you have interesting news, notes, quotes, campaign materials or multimedia that we should feature? Do you have something to report about young voters?

Talk to us »

Contributors to The 12

View contributor bios »

ngjennings

ngjennings

ryankellett

ryankellett

washingtonpostpolitics

washingtonpostpolitics

alison-noon

alison-noon

haleykmetz

haleykmetz

jakepdeschuiteneer

jakepdeschuiteneer

justinlagore

justinlagore

mechellehankerson

mechellehankerson

news-junkie

news-junkie

remadebyjade

remadebyjade

rileyjsnyder

rileyjsnyder

sarahglen

sarahglen

tessafox

tessafox

thatgoeshere

thatgoeshere

tylerborchers

tylerborchers

zachtilly

zachtilly