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  1. President Obama’s re-election and the return of the Democratic majority in the U.S. Senate have solidified Obamacare as law. After months of holding out for Obama’s defeat, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) and other state officials have seven days to decide how to hand Affordable Health Care Act before the federal deadline, Nov. 16.

    The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports what this decision means for Wisconsin, here.

  2. I didn’t run to make history, I ran to make a difference,”

    - Rep. Tammy Baldwin after defeating former Gov. Tommy Thompson and becoming the first openly lesbian woman elected to the U.S. Senate.
  3. Voters in Milwaukee are currently waiting up to two and a half hours to cast their ballots. With just a few hours until polls close, the ballots being cast in Wisconsin right now have the potential to decide the election.

    Voters in Milwaukee are currently waiting up to two and a half hours to cast their ballots. With just a few hours until polls close, the ballots being cast in Wisconsin right now have the potential to decide the election.

  4. The presidential candidates are giving Wisconsin just as much attention as larger election-deciding states like as Ohio and Florida in the final days of the campaign.
With voters in the state seemingly split down the middle, a raspy-voiced Obama made his second appearance in Milwaukee and brought a few friends with him.
Obama was joined by state Democrats such as Mayor Tom Barrett, Sen. Herb Kohl, Rep. Gwen Moore and Rep. Tammy Baldwin and multi-platinum artist Katy Perry.
The President assured a crowd of nearly 20,000 supporters of the importance of  their votes in this election.
“If we win Wisconsin, we’ll win this election,” Obama said.
The President is stop in Wisconsin once more before voters go to the polls, this time with “The Boss” Bruce Springsteen in Madison.

    The presidential candidates are giving Wisconsin just as much attention as larger election-deciding states like as Ohio and Florida in the final days of the campaign.

    With voters in the state seemingly split down the middle, a raspy-voiced Obama made his second appearance in Milwaukee and brought a few friends with him.

    Obama was joined by state Democrats such as Mayor Tom Barrett, Sen. Herb Kohl, Rep. Gwen Moore and Rep. Tammy Baldwin and multi-platinum artist Katy Perry.

    The President assured a crowd of nearly 20,000 supporters of the importance of their votes in this election.

    “If we win Wisconsin, we’ll win this election,” Obama said.

    The President is stop in Wisconsin once more before voters go to the polls, this time with “The Boss” Bruce Springsteen in Madison.

  5. Marquette Law School Poll shows Democrats ahead in Wisconsin

    The final pre-election results from the Marquette Law School Poll show President Obama and Rep. Tammy Baldwin, Senate candidate, ahead of their opponents with Election Day just four days away.

    After months of riding the Wisconsin polling roller coaster, the latest results show Obama with a significant lead over Romney, 51 percent to 43 percent. Professor Charles Franklin, director of the poll, attributes the jump in results to the candidates’ performances in the debates.

    After a tie in poll results two weeks ago, Baldwin has also moved ahead of her Republican opponent, former Gov. Tommy Thompson, 47 percent to 43 percent.

  6. After significant criticism from Wisconsin Republican Senate candidate Tommy Thompson’s campaign, Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D) speaks out about the speculation against the vote she made five years ago.

  7. The son of a Wisconsin State Sen. Neil Kedzie (R-Elkhorn) was hospitalized after defending a Mitt Romney lawn sign in front of his house.

    Sean Kedzie, 22, awoke Oct. 19 to a noise outside his home in Whitewater, Wis. to discovered two men removing his yard sign. After confronting the men, Kedzie was tackled, choked and struck repeatedly about the face and head, according to his father.

    Read more.

  8. Since early voting began in Iowa on September 27, more than 264,000 votes have been cast, 15.6 percent of the total 2008 turnout statewide, and the early returns seem to be breaking hard for President Obama.

    50.2 percent of the ballots cast belonged to registered Democrats; only 29.8% were cast by registered Republicans.

    With just under three weeks until election day, Iowa is already well over halfway to matching its early voting tally from 2008, when about 448,000 people voted early.

    Recent history suggests that high early voting turnout may crucial to an Obama victory in Iowa. In 2008, when early-voter turnout broke 46/31 in favor of Democrats, Barack Obama was able to take Iowa by a double digit margin despite being beaten narrowly by John McCain in votes cast on Election Day.

    It is unclear whether Obama will enjoy such a comfortable lead heading into November 6 this year: 19.9 percent of early ballots were cast by registered independents whose support may have shifted away from the president to some degree in this election cycle.

    For more early voting data, check out this handy site.

About The 12

The 12 is a group Tumblr of The Washington Post and student journalists in 12 battleground states documenting the 2012 presidential election and capturing perspectives of young voters.

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